What Today's Digital Savvy Folks Read to Get Their Day Started

A colleague and I were talking about newspapers the other day and she asked me if I still read newspapers. I said that I did—the paper kind and digital versions of each on my mobile.  This got me to thinking about news consumers and what today’s digital savvy folks read to get their day started.  I have found two great digital sources to start your day: Associated Press’s 10 Things to Know for Today, which is posted on any number of AP Reporter Twitter feeds by 7 a.m.  I usually get mine from @LindseyTanner, the long time medical reporter from the Chicago AP bureau. I also like the Linkedin Daily Rundown which every LI account holder receives as a notification on their account.  The AP Top Ten List has more of a national/international flavor while the LI Daily Rundown is more business and economic news.  Combined, they provide you with a great snapshot of the most important news you need to start your day.

Angie Myers, DJG’s Director of Digital Media

Angie Myers, Director, Digital Media, digital savvyMost mornings, I start the day with the Google News feed. It almost always has the latest news story with up-to-the-minute details and a list of several alternative options so that I can easily access various angles of the story. The problem with only relying on this, or Facebook or another news feed, is that the content is curated according to my preferences and the feed’s algorithm. That means I may not see a story on a topic that is completely new to me and that may be important for me to see or know. Even though Google News has categories such as technology, entertainment, and science, occasionally I’ll miss a major story of interest to me. For example, last weekend, I was watching CNN, and one of the reporters made an off-handed comment about scientists finding a new human organ. I was astounded by that and wondered if I had missed a major story, and in fact, I had. I Googled it and found out about the discovery of the interstitium.

As someone with a bachelor’s degree in journalism, I am worried about the consequences of not being exposed to the front page of a newspaper that is curated by news editors, not an algorithm. That’s why, after Google News, I almost always open some newspaper apps: The New York Times, Washington Post, USA Today, and Daily Mail. By the way, I am also a subscriber to both The New York Times and Washington Post. I believe it is important to support newspaper journalism, especially at time when news organizations are under attack by political figures.

Lynnette Werning, Blue Water Communications Founder and President

Lynnette Werning, President, Blue Water Communications, digital savvyAt Blue Water Communications, a division of DJG, we specialize in museums, architecture, performing arts and destinations.  Early each morning, I do a quick check on what’s happening in the museum world.  We need to be prepared to advise our clients if something is brewing that could negatively impact their institutions.  We check www.artdaily.com, www.hyperallergic.com, www.artnews.com, www.artnet.com and others.  Also – I enjoy reading good art criticism which is becoming very rare.  In the shrinking media market, actual art critics have become scarce so I like to read blogs like Real Clear Arts https://www.artsjournal.com/realcleararts/.

We do a lot of media training for our clients so part of what we do is to search the media landscape for good and bad examples of arts-related interviews.

TLDR

We asked a couple of DJG news hounds what their favorite news sources are and got great feed back from Angie Myers and Lynnette Werning.

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